Soursop fruit is a superfruit for health

Soursop fruit is a superfruit for amazing health

.Please note: This article refers to soursop graviola and guanabana. These three words refer to the same tree and fruit. A soursop fruit is the same thing as graviola fruit and guanabana fruit. Same goes for references to the soursop tree.

If you have visited Mexico, the islands of the Caribbean, or the northern countries of South America, then you have almost certainly seen a soursop tree and soursop fruit growing on it as a large spiny green oval.

The soursop tree is an evergreen tree known to scientists as Annona muricata. The taste of the soursop fruit is a delicious combination of strawberry and pineapple, with sweet and citrus flavors (see more on the fruit’s taste).

This intriguing flavor hays resulted in making soursop a favorite among locals, and famous among those seeking its curative powers.

It is also grown in Africa, and can also be found in Southeast Asia. ouy can even find it in central or south Florida. However, it is most popularly grown for consumption as a garden fruit, and in some places is as common as the apple or maple tree is in the north.

The soursop fruit – also called graviola fruit or guanabana fruit (and various other names), is only one type of Annona. Other types include the jackfruit.

The soursop fruit’s soft pulp and fiber can be used for beverages, desserts, smoothies, and candy, as well as a many medical applications, which we will discuss below…

Amazing health benefits of soursop fruit

While the flavor of soursop fruit makes it a much sought-after food, the uses for it are numerous:

  • The fruit has rich vitamin and nutrient content, including vitamin C, vitamin B, and several antioxidants.
  • Soursop juice can be used topically on skin.
  • Pulverized seeds and graviola leaves can also be used as natural remedies. It can be turned into a healthy tea.

Graviola can control parasites

The anti-parasitic nature of soursop has made it a popular treatment in rural areas of Latin America and South America, especially in areas that parasites flourish. A tea brewed from graviola leaves cut from the tree, can be used to remedy gastrointestinal upset.

Soursop fruit’s anti-inflammatory properties

Joint pain and inflammation caused by gout or arthritis can be remedied by rubbing soursop on the afflicted area. The anti-inflammatory compounds found in soursop can speed healing. They can also sooth pain and improve flexibility. Soursop leaves can be used to treat headaches, insomnia, cystitis, liver problems, diabetes, hypertension and as an anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic and to treat dysentery. The boiling the leaves (to create a tea or salve) can be used to fight parasite, rheumatic and antineuralgic effects when used internally, while the cooked leaves, applied topically, fight rheumatism and abscesses

Relief of breathing issues

If you are struggling with a cough, cold, or other forms of the respiratory ailment, then soursop’s anti-inflammatory properties can help to clear out your airways, relieve congestion, and soothe irritation. Soursop helps loosen or reduce excess phlegm and mucus. Reducing inflammation in the nose and lungs, can also help relieve congestion and speed up healing.

Soursop and insomnia

Soursop tea has been used as a stress relieving strategy for centuries. Anti-inflammatory and soothing properties of soursop make it effective when treating stress and anxiety. Stress hormones can interrupt normal metabolic cycles, and impact sleep patterns. If you suffer from insomnia or restless sleep, then consider drinking soursop tea to help remedy the problem.

Skin health and soursop seeds

The seeds of the soursop fruit can be pulverized into a powder, and made into an astringent. (An astringent is a chemical compound that can shrink or constrict body tissues.) This can help reduce lines and wrinkles in the skin. Soursop seeds used this way can help neutralize the appearance of age spots and skin blemishes. Apply the soursop seed paste to the affected areas of skin to help it become healthier. This also helps ward off bacterial and microbial infections.

Soursop and cancer

Soursop and its cancer-fighting properties is well known in areas where it is grown. Its is especially known for its antioxidant activity, which comes from acetogenins, quinolones and alkaloids. These compounds have been linked to treat or prevent cancer. They can also be used to reduce the size of tumors.

Extensive research has been conducted on the unique compounds in soursop called acetogenins, which are unique to the Annonaceae plant family. They have been widely studied as an alternative cancer treatment. They can apparently cut off blood flow to foreign or non-normal cellular growths, and have already been positively associated with treating breast, pancreatic, prostate, and lung cancers.

However, doctors say use and consumption of soursop is not a replacement for cancer treatment. Many soursop devotees swear by its apparent anti-cancer properties. You should seek medical advice in using natural remedies in conjunction with medical intervention.

Boost immunity with soursop fruit

Soursop can help strengthen your immune system. Add soursop fruit via hot or cold beverages, or in desserts. It will help improve overall health. The fruit stimulates production of white blood cells. Its antioxidant content also helps to reduce free radicals and conditions that cause a variety of chronic diseases.

Soursop can improve gut health

Being rich in vitamin C, soursop was used for many years as a natural remedy for scurvy and dysentery. The juice of the soursop fruit can also be a very effective diuretic, to clean the gut and remove toxins and salts from the body. The anti-inflammatory components, including the alkaloids and quinolones, can reduce parasites in the gut. It can help alleviate pain or irritation in the stomach or colon.

Soursop as a painkiller

Soursop can be applied  topically applied to wounds and injuries. It can help with external pain relief. It also works internally to relieve pain and to help speed healing. The sedative and anti-inflammatory  elements of this amazing tropical fruit make graviola a great remedy for pain internally and externally.

Word of caution about soursop

While these traditional applications of soursop fruit, leaves and seeds can be powerful and effective, the overuse can have some negative impacts as a result of toxicity. Overuse can result in nerve ailments.

If you start to use soursop to help treat an ailment, particularly if you use it to fight cancer, it is important to consult with your primary health practitioner. Speak to your doctor, oncologist, naturopath and other health professionals. They can help you to used properly and in combination with other treatments to help you get well.

Soursop synonyms

Soursop synonyms

What are other words for soursop?

Soursop is known by a variety of different words. The following words are soursop synonyms or related terms that are used when speaking or writing about the fruit.

Soursop

Soursop is the primary name most people use to refer to the fruit of the graviola tree. However botanists refer to it as Annona Muricata, and it is a variety of spiny fruit with a soft and sweet pulpy center.

Graviola

A synonym of soursop. Graviola can also be used as a reference to the tree that the fruit grows on.

Guanábana

Guanábana is a common Spanish name for soursop. Read more about guanabana

Brazilian Paw Paw

The paw paw is unassuming fruit tree that produces  a delicious and sweet fruit (when ripe). Like soursop, it is a member of the Annonaceae family. Botanists believe that there are eight different species of paw paw. One is soursop which is often called the Brazilian paw paw.

Custard Apple

The creamy texture of the soursop flesh gives the fruit its secondary name “custard apple.

Cherimoya

The cherimoya (Annona cherimola) was called chirimuya by the Incan people (a race of ancient Mexicans). It is sometimes spelled: chirimoya. It is a cousin of the soursop, just as a fuji apple and a gala apple are both apples but different types of apple.

Guyabano

In the Philippines, soursop is called guyabano. The word is derived from the Spanish word for soursop: guanábana.

Annona muricata

This is the latin based botanical name for the soursop tree.

Guanaba

Guanaba is the word for soursop in E1 Salvador.

Huanaba

Huanaba is the word for soursop in Guatemala.

; in Mexico, often as

 Zopote de viejas

Zopote de viejas is a Mexican term for soursop. Translated it would mean old sapote. A sapote is a fruit with soft-flesh.

Cabeza de negro

Cabeza de negro is another way Mexicans describe soursop, although this usually refers to a similar fruit called Annona purpurea by botanists.

Related regional words for soursop

  • Venezuela: catoche or catuche
  • Argentina: anona de puntitas or anona de broquel
  • Bolivia: sinini
  • Brazil: araticum do grande, graviola, or jaca do Para
  • Netherlands Antilles: sorsaka
  • Surinam and Java: zunrzak
  • French-speaking areas of the West Indies, West Africa, Southeast Asia, especially in North Vietnam: corossolgrand corossol, corossol epineux, or cachiman epineux.
  • Malaya, In this south Asian nation it may be called durian belanda, durian maki or seri kaya belanda.
  • Thailand: The Thais call soursop this term: thu-rian-khack
Taste of soursop

What does soursop taste like?

The flavor of the soursop fruit is distinctly tropical. It can be described in a variety of ways. Here are some of the ways the tropical fruit’s devotees describe it when it lands on their palate.

What soursop tastes like:

Many of the fruit’s fans say the taste of soursop is exotic and lovely. It has flavors that are is a combination of: Strawberry and pineapple, with sour citrus flavor notes that contrast with its creamy texture, which is similar to the flavors of coconut and banana.

Other soursop lovers claim the spiny and strange-shaped fruit tastes like a combination between a mango and a pineapple. Some say sweetness prevails with a backend tang. Others claim it is more pineapple-flavored, with hints of mango.

Here is yet another take on the flavor of soursop: It has a delicate fragrance that is tropical, fruity, musky. It has a sour profile, but is sweet enough.

On this point, there are some that claim it is very sweet. It can taste like a combination or mixture of three flavors: pineapple, banana and papaya.

Is soursop delicious?

Mark Twain called the cherimoya, a near relative of soursop: “deliciousness itself.” (See more Mark Twain quotes). He said: “We had an abundance of mangoes, papaias and bananas here, but the pride of the islands, the most delicious fruit known to men, cherimoya, was not in season. It has a soft pulp, like a pawpaw, and is eaten with a spoon. The papaia looks like a small squash, and tastes like a paw paw.” This is from a letter he wrote that was published in the Sacramento Daily Union on October 25, 1866, and details his travels in Hawaii.

Mark Twain described the taste of soursop

Mark Twain called the taste of soursop “deliciousness itself”

What cherimoya tastes like:

There is some distinction between the Soursop and Cherimoya, which are related fruit. Think of them of how there are similar varieties of apples or avocados. Cherimoya fruit has a flavor described as a blend of bananas, pineapples, pears, lemons and other tropical fruits. The fruit is four- to eight-inches and is heart-shaped. It opens easily to reveal a white, sweet pulp and small coin-sized hard black seeds.

Journalist Joan Namkoong, writing in Honolulu magazine described the taste of cherimoya this way: “Inside is smooth, cream-colored, custardy flesh that hints at the flavors of pineapple, mango, passion fruit, banana and lemon.”

What is Soursop?

Learn about Soursop fruit

Below are common questions and answers about soursop. These facts were gathered from a variety of sources on- and offline.

"What

What is Soursop?

Soursop is a long, prickly fruit that comes from the graviola tree. It is an evergreen tree native to Malaysia, Vietnam, Mexico, the Caribbean, as well as Central and South America. It’s also known as custard apple, guanabana and Brazilian paw paw. See additional synonyms in the list below.

What are other words for soursop?

Soursop is known by a variety of different words. They include the following synonyms or related words:

  • Soursop
  • Graviola
  • Guanabana
  • Brazilian Paw Paw
  • Custard Apple
  • Custard Pear
  • Cherimoya
  • Annona muricata

Learn more about the origins of these words that are related or are direct synonyms to the word “soursop” and fruit. Click here.

Where does soursop grow?

Soursop grows in tropical climates and can be found growing naturally in Mexico, the Caribbean, Southeast Asia as well as Central and South America. It is grown in small volumes on farms in southern Florida. However the vast major of fresh soursop fruit sold in the US is grown in Grenada. Soursop leaves are imported into the US from all over the world including. This soursop store imports its premium leaves from Malaysia.

What does the soursop fruit and plant look like?

Soursop is a long, prickly fruit that comes from the Graviola tree.

Can I grow soursop at home?

You can obtain seeds and grow the soursop fruit at home provided you keep the tree it grows on in a warm tropical environment where the plant is exposed to lots of sunlight. In its natural habitat, the Graviola tree grows in tropical rainforests with high humidity. Learn more

Can I make soursop leaves into tea?

Soursop grows on a tree called the Graviola, and its leaves can be made into tea. It is the most affordable way to consume soursop to take advantage of its health benefits. See what soursop tea products are available.

Can eating soursop cure cancer?

This is a controversial topic and requires some extensive information and explanation. You can see a detailed discuss of this health claim in our “Can soursop cure cancer” post.

What does soursop taste like?

Fans of soursop describe its taste as a combination of pineapple and mango. Or some say strawberry and banana. Read more.