soursop for back pain

Soursop for back pain

Make tea from soursop leaves for back pain:

Suffering back pain can be debilitating. And, it is a common malady these days for many people. You can use soursop leaves for back pain by using the leaves for soursop tea. It can be a good remedy to treat back pain, without the side effects that you risk from pharmaceutical medications used for pain management.

Note that you might see the leaves advertised as guanabana leaves, soursop leaves or graviola leaves. These are three different words for the same tree (and fruit).

The active ingredient is highly concentrated in the leaves, twigs and bark, so best to use these and not the soursop fruit.

Here’s how to use soursop leaves as a back pain remedy:

  1. Buy some air dried organic soursop leaves (also called graviola leaves) from Soursopstore.com
  2. Crush 5 large dried soursop leaves
  3. Boil 5 cups of water
  4. Drop leaves into water
  5. Reduce to until only 3 cups of water are left.
  6. Drink ¾ cup of this soursop leaf  once in a day for back pain relief.

Note: Some people drink 1 cup (250 ml) of the soursop tea for back pain that they consume 3 times per day before each meal, because it hits the bloodstream faster.

Caution: Avoid soursop consumption by small children under the age of 2, and pregnant and nursing mothers. Over use of soursop can lead to soursop toxicity. Always consult your naturopath or health care provider for professional medical guidance.

soursop ice tea recipe

Soursop Ice Tea

soursop ice tea recipe

Soursop Ice Tea Recipe

  1. Boil about 5-7 graviola (soursop) leaves in 1-2 quarts water for about 10-20 minutes (order them here)
  2. Add 1 regular orange pekoe tea bag
  3. Add 3 green tea bags
  4. Add 3 flavored tea bags – like raspberry tea – and let steep.
  5. After cooling add enough water to make 1 gallon.
  6. Add 1/2 teaspoon of pure stevia extract or agave syrup for sweetness and to taste. A good spoonful or two of honey for sweetness can also be used.
  7. Then add 1/4th teaspoon of powder vitamin C.

Keep the iced tea in the fridge and add ice to your glass. Garnish with a citrus wedge.

See more soursop recipes here.

Best soursop recipes

top 10 soursop recipes

Soursop recipes to make at home

Soursop is not only an amazing healthy fruit, but is also very versatile as an ingredient in food. Here are our top 10 favorite soursop recipes you can make at home:

  1. Soursop Ice Cream – The creamy, sweet texture of soursop is ideal as the focus on icec cream, so check out this amazing soursop ice cream  recipe from the Washington Post.
  2. Soursop Punch – This our quick recipe for and easy soursop punch.
  3. Soursop Margarita – This is one of our favorite drinks that is made with soursop. You can drink it with your eyes as well. Soursop Margarita Recipe
  4. Soursop Ice Tea – This is an amazingly refreshing drink. See the easy recipe here.
  5. Soursop Smoothie – This soursop smoothie recipe is made with soursop pulp and condensed milk. Yum! See soursop smoothie steps.
  6. Soursop Cheesecake – When it comes to soursop the answer is always yes. When you add it to cheesecake…it’s YES!!! See the recipe here from Trinidad.
  7.  Guanabana Cream Pie – This is delicious and creamy, and maybe not supe rhealthy, but it does contain soursop! Soursop pie recipe
soursop cancer research

Soursop and cancer research

A summary of all the cancer research on soursop and its tumor-fighting properties

Soursop, also known as guanabana, graviola, cherimoya, custard apple, and Brazilian paw paw, is a little-known fruit that grows in the rainforests of Africa, Southeast Asia, the Caribbean and South America. It comes from an evergreen tree (Annona muricata) where all parts have medicinal uses – the roots, bark, leaves, and fruit. 

The soursop cancer fighting  topic has recently made headlines. Medical research shows that compounds in the superfood can shrink and inhibit tumors. Here is all the most up-to-date information about this life-changing fruit.

Disclaimer: We present this information to help you make informed decisions. But at no time do we advocate that you change or discontinue treatment as prescribed by your doctor based on information in this article. We have provided sources to information gathered here and we recommend you use them to make up your own mind.

Active ingredients in soursop

The soursop is a large, heart-shaped edible fruit that grows in clusters on the Annona muricata. It is bright green in color, with small spikes on its skin. The active ingredient in the soursop fruit is thought to be annonaceous acetogenins, a phytochemical or plant compound. People can eat the sweet white pulp of the fruit plain or make it into smoothies, fruit drinks, sherbets, candies, shakes, syrups, and beverages.

The fruit has a sweet, citrusy flavor somewhere between a strawberry and a pineapple. People in countries where the Annona muricata grows naturally have used the soursop fruit for years for medicinal purposes.

Annona muricata and cancer treatmentAccording to the National Cancer Institute’s drug dictionary, annonaceous acetogenins is a family of polyketides that naturally occur in the plant family Annonaceae.

NCI states that the phytochemical isolated from various species of the plant family have potential antineoplastic and antimicrobial activity – meaning that they can bind to and block the activity of an enzyme that’s overexpressed in cancer cells’ plasma membranes (ubiquinone-linked NADH oxidase). In layman’s terms, annonaceous acetogenins can inhibit cancer cell growth and induce tumor cell death.

Research on soursop’s anticancer effects

According to a 2015 journal article in Contemporary Clinical Dentistry, “Cancer: Forbidden Cures?” researchers are primarily interested in the soursop because of its “strong anticancer effects.” Author S. G. Damle remarks on the interest of the fruit’s anti-tumor effects, and says the plant is a “proven cancer remedy for cancers of all types.” The article says that patients can use soursop as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent for infections, as well as for lowering blood pressure and treating depression and stress.

In “Graviola: A Systematic Review on Its Anticancer Properties” by European University Cyprus School of Medicine authors Patrikios Ioannis, Stephanou Anastasis, and Yiallouris Andreas, the authors discuss the connection between phytochemicals and easing various diseases, including cancer. The article states that the Graviola, along with its roots, leaves, and seeds has beneficial properties in alternative medicine. It cites many sources that indicate annonaceous acetogenins as the main active ingredients in soursop, and other published data that point to soursop’s ability to inhibit a variety of cancer cells, including:

Compounds in the fruit, leaves, stem, or bark of the soursop have anticancer characteristics that promote programmed cell death on cancer cells without harming healthy, normal host cells. This marks a great departure from traditional cancer treatments, which do not differentiate between which cells live or die. Studies show that annonaceous acetogenins found only in the Annonaceae family kill the malignant cells of 12 different types of cancer.

How does soursop fight cancer?

Based on medical research, soursop works to fight and inhibit malignant cancer cells in a variety of ways. When applied to breast cancer cells in a medical research study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, researchers found that the phytochemicals in the soursop promoted programmed cell death, or “apoptosis,” in pathways relating to the cancer cells. It decreased breast tumor growth in nude mice lab tests, while also inhibiting the expressions of two types of breast cancer cells – ER-cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. Extracts of the fruit inhibit the growth of overexpressing human cancer cells without interrupting non-tumorigenic breast cells.

Another study of the soursop fruit leaves from 2014 found that the leaves had “significant effects on cell survival potential” on colon cancer cells. The extract of the soursop leaves induced programmed cell death using reactive oxygen species while down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins. This process released cytochrome c, which activated the trigger of programmed cancer cell death through DNA fragmentation. The soursop inhibited cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact and unaffected.

In BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, seven researchers conducted a medical study to determine the cancer-fighting effects of soursop extracts on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, or HL-60 cells. The results of the study concluded that all extracts tested did in fact inhibit the rapid reproduction of HL-60 cells in a “concentration dependent manner.”

How soursop kills leukemia cancer cells

The study discovered that the fruit inhibited the growth of leukemia cancer cells by disrupting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and arresting the G0/G1 cell cycle. Other ways the soursop interrupts different types of cancer cells include inhibiting tumor mobility and cellular metabolism, down regulating the expression of cancer-related factors, and stopping tumors by inhibiting growth of cancerous cells.

What could soursop mean for the future of cancer medicine?

Dozens of medical research studies on soursop-derived compounds since at least the early 1970s have found evidence of the soursop’s ability to stop and fight cancer cells, thanks to the active ingredient annonaceous acetogenins. Studies on mice and humans have come to the same conclusion again and again – annonaceous acetogenins can and will have inhibited cancer cell growth and lead to programmed cancer cell death. Despite the large number of laboratory studies with cancer-fighting results, there are still doubts about the soursop’s capabilities in the industry.

Lack of research on how soursop extracts work on humans

Doubts stem from lack of research into exactly how the soursop’s extracts work on humans. As scientists develop their understanding of how annonaceous acetogenins work to fight cancer, the world can expect more information and possible acceptance of the soursop as a cancer-stopping superfood. If studies on the soursop continue in the same vein as they have for almost 50 years, there is high hope that the fruit of the evergreen tree will become an accepted potential cure for cancer – one that serves as an alternative or complement to existing cancer treatments.

Other medical uses for soursop

Known positive effects of the soursop exist without relation to cancer treatment. People have used the soursop to treat hypertension, arthritis, stomach problems, fevers, and infections (parasitic and bacterial). Soursop is known to ease endocrine system issues and to support healthy activity of the ovaries, prostate glands, thyroid, pancreas, kidneys, gall bladder, liver, and intestines. It also acts as an effective sedative. Anti-cancer properties are the latest believed benefits of the soursop, despite the topic currently being up for debate.

Dissenting opinions about soursop and its anticancer potency

As much as the research cited in this article is based on legitimate science and research, there are some organizations that disagree with the premise that soursop has anticancer properties. There are as follows:

  • “There is no evidence to show that graviola (soursop) works as a cure for cancer.” – Cancer Research UK
  • “…as yet, there have been no large scale tests on humans and there is no credible evidence to support claims that graviola is an effective cure or treatment for cancer” –Hoax-Slayer.com
  • “The fruit from the graviola tree is a miraculous natural cancer cell killer. UNDETERMINED.”-Snopes.com

The bottom line:  Eat your soursop or drink your soursop tea

Existing knowledge based on in-depth medical and scientific research studies supports the fact that extracts of the soursop can in fact inhibit the growth of cancer cells, potentially preventing, fighting, and even curing cancer. More research is necessary to identify the exact mechanisms of how soursop extracts work, as well as clinical trials to test and verify its potential as an anti-cancer agent. However, as of today, enough studies have shown anti-cancer properties in soursop to encourage thousands of people around the world to start introducing this fruit into their diets.

As excitement over the potential cancer-fighting properties of the soursop grows, the fruit and its extracts are becoming more easily available on the market. It is now easy to order farm-grown soursop fruit online and purchase related products such as organic soursop leaves for tea. People living in tropical climates with easy access to soursop fruit have consumed the fruit and its byproducts for centuries, accepting it as a superfruit that has beneficial properties for almost the entire body. Soursop is rich in vitamins and nutrients, as well as several antioxidants – not to mention the potential anti-cancer elements.

The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the active ingredient in soursop fruits may be a real-life cure for cancer. The acetogenins found in the soursop are completely unique to this plant and widely studied as a treatment for multiple types of cancer. Perhaps the most exciting part about the discovery of soursop’s anti-cancer properties is that it leaves healthy cells untouched. As researchers learn more about how annonaceous acetogenins kill cancer cells, expect to hear more about this amazing “miracle” superfood. Soursop may be the key to curing cancer once and for all.

Sources for this article:

Guanabana fruit

What is guanabana fruit used for?

guanabana fruitGuanabana fruit is also known as soursop and is harvested from the graviola tree. The tall tropical tree is a small, upright evergreen tree that grows 15 to 18 ft (5 to 6 meters) in height.
The guanabana tree produces a large heart-shaped edible guanabana fruit that is 6 to 9 inches long. The inedible skin is yellowish green in color. Inside is white flesh dotted with 3/4 inch black or brown seeds.
You can find the fruit in most of the warmest tropical areas in South and North America including the Amazon, the Caribbean and Mexico. It also grows in south Florida.
It can also be found in local markets in the tropics.  Sometimes guanabana fruit is referred to as soursop, custard apple, custard pear, paw paw, or sometimes Brazilian cherimoya.

What is the guanabana fruit used for in the kitchen?

Guanabana fruit is excellent for making drinks, ice creams and and frozen desserts. Though it can be slightly sour and acidic, as it ripens , it can be eaten raw.

What is guanabana fruit used for in natural medicine?

GuanabanaThe guanabana fruit and fruit juice can be eaten to treat worms and parasites, to cool fevers, to increase mother’s milk after childbirth. It is also used to treat diarrhea and dysentery.
The crushed guanabana seeds in the fruit pulp are used to treat internal and external parasites and worms.

History of guanabana fruit in regional natural medicine

Guanabana fruit has a long rich history of use in herbal medicine, and among indigenous peoples in the tropics.

Peru

You find  that a tea from the guanabana leaf is used for mucus reduction in the Peruvian Andes. The crushed seeds of the fruit are used to kill parasites. In the Peruvian Amazon the bark roots and leaves are used for diabetes and as a sedative and antispasmodic.

Guyana

Indigenous tribes in Guyana use a guanabana leaf tea of as a sedative and heart tonic.

Brazil

In the Brazilian Amazon, the unripened fruit is combined with olive oil. It is used externally for neuralgia, rheumatism and to treat arthritis pain.

Jamaica and Caribbean islands

In the Caribbean, especially in Jamaica, Guanabana fruit and its juice has long been used to treat:
  • fevers
  • parasites
  • to bring in mother’s milk.
  • to ease diarrhea.
  • And, to treat cancer

Plus, it is also used for heart conditions, coughs, difficult childbirth, asthma, asthenia, hypertension and to clear parasites.